Separate But Equal Trivia

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  • This is the DoubleTroublets' first documentary.

  • The DoubleTroublets' named the film after their sister's speech "Separate But Equal." It wasn't until later that they learned what this meant and its foundation in the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling. 

  • The subtitle, "The Ruling That Changed The Future," actually refers to the Brown v. Board of Education ruling which deemed the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling of separate but equal unconstitutional. They came up with the title early into the research and didn't realize the two parts of the title conflicted until it was too late. Out of embarrassment of their own stupidity, they rarely refer to it by its full name. 

  • It is the DoubleTroublets least favorite documentary.

  • This is the only documentary that Sarah filmed the interviews while Emma asked questions. Once they looked over the footage and saw the bad framing, frequent zooming, and overall poor job Sarah had done and listened to Emma stumble over questions, they knew they had to switch places. 

  • This is the DoubleTroublets only film edited using iMovie.

  • This is the only DoubleTroublets' documentary that is not a DoubleTroublets Production. They would not form DoubleTroublets Productions until after this film was completed. 

  • The film was originally going to be about seven of the Little Rock Nine who had transferred from Horace Mann to attend Central. It was going to be called “From Bearcats to Tigers” (Bearcats are Mann’s mascots, Tigers are Central’s.) Eventually they decided the Nine were too picked over and chose to focus on the entire desegregation act. They later narrowed it down to just Arkansas desegregation.

  • Interviewees Arthur and Scott Gillium are the grandfather and uncle of Archer Tribbet, who is credited as a photo researcher.

  • The original version of the narration was recorded on a Dictaphone, but was discarded because it was hard to understand. The last line of the narration “we are all equal” is actually cut from the first recording.

  • The speech recited at the end was written by the DoubleTroublets’ second oldest sister, Grady Bailin, for her communications class in ninth grade at Little Rock Central High School.

  • The interview with Herb Rule was the first interview the DoubleTroublets ever conducted.

  • For a short time during the interview with Herb Rule, every time he opened his mouth, a dump truck would go rolling past the window and drown out his voice.

  • The interview with Herb Rule was done at the DoubleTroublets' mother's office, The Rose Law Firm. This venue was used again for David Martin's interview in "Return To Sender." Both Rule and Martin are partners at the firm.

  • The ending quote is from the DoubleTroublets science teacher at the time, Daryl Newcomb.

  • Skip Rutherford judged the film at the Regional History Day Competition. The DoubleTroublets interviewed him later for "Return To Sender."

  • Towards the end of the film, during the speech, a picture from a high school yearbook appears on the screen. It is from Little Rock Central High School's 2004 yearbook. The DoubleTroublets' sister, Grady Bailin and author of the speech is on the left side. 

  • This is the first of two credits Grady Bailin has received in a DoubleTroublets Production. She is also credited in Return To Sender as the composer. 

  • When the narration lists the Little Rock Nine, it uses their current names. Most of them, however, are mispronounced. For example Minnie Jean Brown Tricky was called Minnie Jean Brown Trickily. Whether this was caused by a bad source or just a slip of the tongue is unclear. The narrator also mispronounces Governor Faubus' name on numerous occasions. 

  • A section of this film is on the desegregation of Little Rock Central High School. The DoubleTroublets are currently juniors there.