Watching The Waters Rise Trivia

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  • This is the DoubleTroublets second documentary.

  • The letter was first read by the DoubleTroublets' classmate and team member, Janean Jordan, but due to poor sound quality, it had to be rerecorded. Their neighbor volunteered. Janean was later given the leading part in the DoubleTroublets' first live action film, "Just Plain Odd."

  • During the making of the DoubleTroublets' third documentary, "Return to Sender," interviewee L.D. Holt died. "Return to Sender" is dedicated to him.

  • The DoubleTroublets were once asked why the "Special Thanks To" list in the credits was so long. They said it was because they'd forgotten where they put their special thank you card stationary. 

  • The film was edited on Casablanca. Casablanca does not allow the editor to edit audio and visuals at the same time. This is why the audio fades and transitions are so bad.

  • This and "Separate But Equal" are the only two documentaries made by the DoubleTroublets that do not have the DoubleTroublets Production logo at the end. DTP was not formed until after the completion of "Separate But Equal" and the logo was not designed until shortly before the completion of their third documentary "Return to Sender." The opening does label this film as a DoubleTroublets production however. 

  • The Corp’s footage was found on a German website by museum curator Harvey Hanna in Forest City, Arkansas. It took three days to fully download.

  • The person who reads the letter from Marjorie Gaston is the DoubleTroublets’ neighbor, Molly Carroll. Molly is actually from Baltimore and acted the southern accent for the letter.

  • In the letter, the greetings is “dear Bouise,” although the caption above the papers in which the letter was found say Marjorie Gaston only had a sister named Louise. Bouise was either a nickname for Louise, or the person who copied the letter into the files made a mistake.

  • The DoubleTroublets’ EAST facilitator, Mr. Rick Washam, recorded several letters from a relief worker that unfortunately were cut from the film due to time restraints.

  • Although the film is about Arkansas during the flood, at one point the narrator mentions that the Cumberland River in Nashville reached an unheard of height. The Cumberland River is in Nashville, Tennessee. The DoubleTroublets didn’t realize their mistake until they heard it in a competition three months after it was completed. Geography is not their strong point.

  • When the narrator talks about how the soil was richer than ever before, it shows clips of people shoveling dirt into bags. The people are actually sandbagging the levees.

  • When the narration talks about camp life, a clip of a camp is on the screen. This clip was too short, so the DoubleTroublets doubled it. You can see a man in a nightshirt up front walk halfway past his tent, then suddenly return to where he started and continue forward again.

  • Ruth Lincoln, the first interviewee, is the oldest woman in Arkansas at 111 years old. She is the grandmother-in-law of Senator Blanch Lincoln.

  • Interviewee L.D. Holt was the DoubleTroublets’ history teacher’s father.

  • Sammy Peters, an artist friend of their father, discovered the songs heard throughout the film.

  • Many of the pictures seen in the film came courtesy of Pete Daniels, author of Deep’n As It Comes.

  • The DoubleTroublets got the idea for the film from their mother.

  • Their favorite story was about the police chief in one ravaged town putting a sign up in the square reading “no fat people are to go swimming as the water rises a few inches every time they go for a dip.” Unfortunately they couldn’t work it into the narration.

  • The DoubleTroublets traveled so much for the film that they put a map on the wall and stuck pins in it to mark where they had been. The map with all its pins still hangs on the wall after two years. They have no intention of taking it down any time soon.

  • This is the last documentary made before the DoubleTroublets received formal training on how to make a film. 

  • At the end of the interview clip of Ruth Lincoln, a faint "che-che-che" sound can be heard. This is the sound of one of the DoubleTroublets' partners swinging his arms in a nylon jacket behind the camera. In the other half of the clip that is not shown, you could actually hear Emma whispering at him to stop because she wouldn't be able to edit it out. 

  • This was the last documentary made with additional team members. 

  • The interview with Ruth Lincoln was arguably the hardest one the DoubleTroublets have ever conducted. She could not hear above a certain pitch, so all the questions had to be relayed to her through their father. She was also partially blind and could not see where the camera was. Consequently her eye line is all off.